Boeing tested Starliner emergency rescue system


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Boeing tested Starliner emergency rescue system

On Monday, November 4, at the White Sands military training ground in the state of New Mexico, tests of the emergency rescue system (CAC) of the Straliner ship developed by Boeing were tested. As part of the tests, the test model of the ship was installed on a special stand simulating the upper stage of the Atlas 5 rocket. Having received a signal about a carrier accident, the ship activated four SAS engines in order to move away from the rocket to a safe distance in the shortest possible time. He then made a soft landing on the ground, using a parachute and air-cushion shock absorbers.

Of the three manned ships that are currently being created in the United States, only the Starliner command compartment (return vehicle) will be reusable. This is achieved through the use of shock absorbing pillows. SpaceX has reused Dragon cargo ship capsules that descend into the ocean, but NASA has not authorized this practice for manned flights. It cannot be ruled out that SpaceX will convert Dragon 2 manned ships into cargo ships for restarting without people already.

In a press release, Boeing announced that all test objectives have been achieved. The analysis of the collected data will take some time, but previously it can be assumed that the CAC of the Starliner ship coped with its tasks. Formally, this is true, but the Boeing statement hides a little cunning. In total, the tests carried out pursued eight goals, one of which was to verify the deployment of parachutes and shock absorbers. As often happens, the goal is written in such a way that any verification result counts as success. However, in reality, the tests of the parachutes were not completely successful: one of the three domes of the parachute did not open, which, however, did not prevent the system from fulfilling its task and ensuring a soft landing.

The Boeing statement said that this incident will not interfere with the first flight tests of the ship, scheduled for December 17. However, it can undoubtedly provoke the transfer of the first manned flight, because the incident will require investigation, and the parachute system will need improvements.

Against this background, the twitter account that Roscosmos maintains on behalf of the FEDOR robot distinguished itself sarcastic commentary about failures in the American program for creating manned ships. The statement that the CAC tests were unsuccessful does not correspond to reality: as mentioned above, all the objectives of the test are achieved. Roscosmos itself does not disdain the understatement of targets, and therefore must understand the difference between successful trials and unsuccessful from a formal point of view. It is strange to read this, given that all Roskosmos employees except one are professionals with specialized education.

Perhaps five-year-olds can believe that FEDOR is tweeting on its own — like the Curiosity rover and Jupiter’s satellite Juno — but Roscosmos is not a state corporation for organizing children's parties. All accounts on social networks officially affiliated with Roscosmos represent his position, and, from a political point of view, making fun of partners cannot be acceptable. As the head of Roscosmos Dmitry Rogozin recently stated, his position is not technical, but political. In this regard, it is completely unclear where the posts in social networks representing the state corporation appear that are completely unacceptable from a political point of view.

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